Monday, January 17, 2011

NATURAL AND HUMAN THREATS TO SEA TURTLES



WHAT YOU CAN DO TO HELP:
1) Anyone who lives near a beach should turn lights off at night-especially those seen from the beach.

2) Never leave beach chairs or other items out overnight.  They can entrap nesting sea turtles or hatchings, leading to their death.

3) Never approach or take flash photos of turtles.  Lights and noise can hinder turtles' ability to nest or find their way back to the sea.

4)Keep oceans, bays and rivers pollution-free.  Take a trash bag with you when you go to the beach and remove any trash you see. 

BE SURE TO REPORT INJURED OR DEAD SEA TURTLES, POACHING OF EGGS OR OTHER WILDLIFE EMERGENCIES.  CALL WILDLIFE ALERT HOTLINE- 1-888-404-3922

Thursday, January 13, 2011

HOPE FOR HAITI ONE YEAR LATER

Click on the link below to read and view a news interview about the good Lambi Fund of Haiti is  doing for earthquake victims.  If you ever pondered upon making a donation for Haiti relief efforts, Lambi Fund is a good , sound organization to donate to.  In this tough economy, I feel confident that every single cent I donate to the Lambi Fund  will be used to actually help the earthquake victims.  Please feel free to leave comments.

http://www.9news.com/news/world/article.aspx?storyid=175344&catid=328&plckFindCommentKey=CommentKey:f360f6ef-a106-4cca-bf0c-1b7d72c1ab54#CommentKey:f360f6ef-a106-4cca-bf0c-1b7d72c1ab54

Wednesday, January 12, 2011

                                  HAITI: ONE YEAR LATER

SIGNING OF EMERGENCY GRANTS
HAITIAN GIRLS ON THE WAY TO SCHOOL


Hello all :  Below is an article I wrote that was published on Blogcritics earlier today.  I want to extend a heartfelt thank you to all who gave a donation for Haiti relief.   I also want to say thank you to those who have purchased a copy of "Marie and her Friend the Sea Turtle" I donate a portion of the proceeds from book sales to the Lambi Fund of Haiti.

Today is the first anniversary of the devastating earthquake that changed my native Haiti forever. Even though life in Haiti will never be the same, I would like to take a moment to talk about some good news I received from Karen Ashmore, executive director of the Lambi Fund of Haiti, an organization whose goal is to assist "community-based organizations that promote the social and economic empowerment of the Haitian people."

Immediately following the earthquake, the Lambi Fund sprang into action to provide immediate and effective relief to needy families. The Fund distributed emergency grants to 44 grassroots organizations to purchase life essentials like food, water, shelter, and medical supplies. A total of 8,000 - 9,000 people received emergency relief, representing 1,080 families with an average of eight people per family.
It is truly heartwarming to have learned how quickly the Lambi Fund staffers came to the aid of the Haitian people.

Here is what two individuals had to say about the Lambi Fund:
Mr. Josephat, a member of a community organization in the Artibonite, recalled:
"I had 21 people, strangers staying with me and my family. We did not think twice about welcoming them, but we had not yet figured out how they would be cared for or how they would be fed.
"When we heard about Lambi Fund's program to help impacted families, I was so happy that I cried. I cried because I was touched and shocked that people who had been at the center of this disaster had the time to think about us.
"I was so proud to be a member of a strong organization, and I really deeply understood why being organized is the path to a better life. We would have been left to our own devices without Lambi Fund's support.
"The government never came and the NGOs which did drop by brought free food supplies and their methods of distribution stripped us of our dignity."


A beneficiary of the Fund's assistance said:
“My name is Ostazia. My husband and I have 10 children and we live in the North West. After the January 12, 2010 earthquake which destroyed Port-au-Prince, our household increased by 10 more people. This was extremely problematic as we did not have the means to care for them. It is thanks to my organization and the Lambi Fund that we got the relief we so desperately needed. THANK YOU VERY MUCH, THANK YOU!”

The above news made my day. I am very thankful for such a great organization as the Lambi Fund. I will continue to donate money to the Fund, because I know that the money is being put to good use.
For an extensive breakdown of Lambi Fund’s earthquake relief, please read the Earthquake Activities Update on their website.


Read more: http://blogcritics.org/culture/article/haiti-one-year-later/page-2/#ixzz1Ar8tc6Mg

Read more: http://blogcritics.org/culture/article/haiti-one-year-later/#ixzz1Ar79MkPS

Monday, January 3, 2011

TURTLE PARTS

Turtle Parts

Carapace of a turtle
Carapace-top shell, an outgrowth of bone.
Flippers-pond turtle has flat feet, webbed toes for digging in mud, tearing food, courtship, sea turtle has broad flippers for swimming.
Plastron-bottom shell
A turtle's scutes
Scutes-scales over both shells, made of keratin like your fingernails
A turtle withdrawing into its shell
Neck-pond turtle can fold neck into its shell in S-shape, sea turtle can't
Nostrils-near the top of head so turtle won't have to stick head far out of water to breathe
Turtle beak
Beak-no teeth, but jagged beak catches, holds, and slices food
Ears-no outside parts to slow it down underwater

LEATHERBACK TURTLES

                                     LEATHERBACK TURTLES

Did you that the female leatherback sea turtle is the largest turtle in the world?  This turtle is as big as a single bed and weighs more than a refrigerator.  Her skin is thick and rubbery.  When she comes to shore to lay her eggs  she crawls very slowly because of her huge body. Adults can grow almost as long as 10 feet . In a single year an adult leatherback might migrate 9,320 miles.
This turtle will nest every two or three years and will lay seventy to ninety eggs in each nest.  In a single nesting season, she may return to a beach five or six times to lay her eggs.
Leatherbacks are endangered with the greatest threats coming from fishing nets, in which the sea turtle may drown.

Sunday, January 2, 2011

WHY DO SEA TURTLES MIGRATE?




Sea turtles migrate for two reasons:
One- Because they are cold –blooded, they need to stay in warm water all year long.  When the water gets cold they migrate to warmer waters.  Sea turtles are very fast, they can zip through the water 20 miles per hour.  They use their strong front legs to glide swiftly through the water with the least amount of effort.
Two- The female sea turtle migrate to a nesting site. One very interesting fact is the female sea turtle have what is called a natural homing instinct.  Homing instinct means the sea turtle eventually returns to the beach where she was born to lay her eggs.
 Even though sea turtles are very fast in the sea but migrating to land is very hard work for the female sea turtle.  It takes a lot of effort for the female sea turtle to slowly drag herself across a sandy beach.    After laying her eggs, the female sea turtle returns to the sea.